Sunday, October 1, 2017

Today's walk report: 100117, Become, Seem, Appear

Become, Seem, Appear...

I was going to go with a different title but I just saw the above as a song title in my music library* and it struck me as being appropriate for this post. We left for a walk at about 7:45 A.M., it was cool and overcast. It was gray. It actually looked like fall, which it is, but the look and feel of autumn isn't something to count on at the beginning of October in SoCal. It wasn't a great morning for taking pictures... unless you really looked close. So that's what I did.

The first image is what most people see walking along (and even then you have to pay attention). The second image is what you see if you look closely, sometimes very closely.

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 Last one and I forgot to take a full shot for this. That whole idea was an afterthought. This is kind of in between anyway so you can probably figure it out.


Once again, thanks for coming along. It's been swell having you on board. Think peace.

* Become, Seem, Appear is from the album, Oregon, In Concert 1975. Look it up, it's great music.

Monday, August 21, 2017

Today's walk report: 082117, Leptotes marina

The last walk with camera in tow was 15 days ago. While we've had some relief here lately generally speaking it's been hot, humid and hostile to outdoor activity. We'll get over it.

Anyway, August 6th and the star of the walk was one of my favorite butterflies, Leptotes marina, aka, the marine blue. I think it's a pretty little butterfly but one of the main reasons I like to take pictures of it is because it's such a pain in the ass to do so. They flutter rather hysterically, they don't typically light on anything for very long and they rarely open their wings--usually only during mating. Although, they do that with some frequency (multiple brooding). On the beauty side they are so distinctly different looking between wings closed and wings open you'd almost think it was a different butterfly.

Here are some images from 080617 (yeah, that's month, day and year--I've been labeling images like that forever and I'm not about to change).

All of these were taken while butterflies were attempting to mate on a Baja fairy duster bush (Calliandra californica). That's where I most typically find them in this botanical garden.







Just to round out this post, here are some other images I've taken over the last few years of Leptotes marina. These may appear elsewhere in this blog.

At home, Leptotes marina is everywhere right now. They are known to breed extensively on Plumbago and we have several large Plumbago plants on the property.


Ovipositing on Plumbago buds.

Another plant they frequent back in the local botanical garden, Westringia 'Blue Gem'.




And back to the Baja fairy duster...



Head on.
This was taken 3 years before the 3rd shot above. Ah, same old, same old.

Thanks for stopping by. Be good and have fun.

Monday, July 24, 2017

Today's walk report: 072417, unfolding

Unfolding... This isn't really a walk report, it's another stroll report. The strolling took place around the front, back and side yards of our property and that's not much of a stroll. Full circle, it's about 110 yards (100 meters).

Can the principles of origami . . . help scientists understand the nature of the universe?

The "unfolding" project was partially inspired by an episode of NOVA on PBS entitled, The Origami Revolution. I highly recommend it. After you finish my post you may find it, at least for now, on YouTube--here.* I have had a long term relationship with origami starting with a childhood fascination. I have, however, only dabbled in the art from time to time.

There was, for example, a stint I had with paper money folding in the 90s. Bored waiting for others to finish a meal I would sometimes fold tip money at a restaurant in creative ways...


and folding money took some other directions too...


That is technically called a cubeoctahedron, but is otherwise referred to as, six bucks. It's been sitting on my desk for years.

Another fascination for me has been how plants and especially flowers, unfold. That takes our journey right outside of the window now in front of me. Almost all of these images were captured throughout the second week of April, 2017. Yes, it's taken me this long to pull this stuff and myself together enough to get this done.

Centaurea cyanus.
Centaurea cyanus.
Linum grandiflorum.
Linum grandiflorum,
Linum grandiflorum.
Linum grandiflorum.
Centaurea cyanus and Linum grandiflorum.
Eschscholzia californica.
Eschscholzia californica.
Eschscholzia californica.
Eschscholzia californica.
Papaver rhoeas.
Papaver rhoeas.
Papaver rhoeas
Papaver rhoeas.
Papaver rhoeas.
Papaver rhoeas.
Papaver rhoeas.
Papaver rhoeas.
Papaver rhoeas.
Papaver rhoeas.
Bearded Iris.
Bearded Iris.
Bearded Iris.
Bearded Iris.
Bearded Iris.
Bearded Iris.
Bearded Iris.
Bearded Iris.
Alrighty then, now that wasn't so difficult was it, Eric? Thanks for coming along. More walk reports are forthcoming as soon as the weather (high temps) starts to cooperate a little--stay turned.

* Update on the YouTube link to The Origami Revolution, it has been deleted. You may want to search your local PBS site or try NOVA on devices such as Apple TV. It's worth looking for.